Thursday, January 13, 2011

ERASURE | Press Kits | Collectibles

ERASURE
Wonderland
Sire
5|1|1986








VARIOUS MAGAZINE CLIPPINGS


ERASURE
The Circus
Sire
3|20|1987




PROMO THE CIRCUS AD


VARIOUS MAGAZINE CLIPPINGS













SMASH HITS STICKER



ERASURE
[Sometimes]
Star Hits
5|1987



ERASURE
The Two-Ring Circus
Sire
11|16|1987




ERASURE
Live At The Seaside
[The Circus Tour]
Virgin Music Video
1987



ERASURE
The Innocents
Sire|Reprise
4|18|1988




PROMO THE INNOCENTS BILLBOARD AD


PROMO ERASERS


THE INNOCENTS
JAPANESE 3" CD RELEASES

ERASURE
SHIP OF FOOLS
10SR-21
Alfa Records
6|25|1988


ERASURE
A LITTLE RESPECT
10SR-33
Alfa Records
11|28|1988


ERASURE
THE INNOCENTS TOUR
Lisner Auditorium | George Washington University
Washington DC
7|14|1988


THE INNOCENTS TOUR ENAMEL PIN


PROMO SHIP OF FOOLS AD


PROMO CHAINS OF LOVE ADS



VARIOUS MAGAZINE CLIPPINGS















ERASURE
Crackers International
Sire|Reprise
11|28|1988





CRACKERS INTERNATIONAL AD


ERASURE INFORMATION SERVICE (EIS)

BADGE


MEMBERSHIP CARD
1989 COUNTER CULTURE


ERASURE
Wild!
Sire|Reprise
11|16|1989


SIGNED BY ANDY & VINCE







PROMO UK WILD! BOX SET


PIERRE et GILLES BRILLIANT IMAGE!


PROMO WILD! AD


PROMO WILD! BILLBOARD AD


PROMO BLUE SAVANNAH AD


VARIOUS MAGAZINE CLIPPINGS






WILD!
JAPANESE 3" CD RELEASES

ERASURE
DRAMA!
09B3-73
Alfa Records
10|25|1989


ERASURE
BLUE SAVANNAH
ALDB-9
Alfa Records
1|25|1990



ERASURE
STAR | DREAMLIKE STATE
ALDB-44
Alfa Records
5|25|1990


ERASURE
WILD! TOUR
Bender Arena | American University
Washington DC
2|18|1990


WILD! TOUR ENAMEL PIN


ERASURE
A MIDSUMMER NIGHT'S TOUR
Special Guest: Louie Louie
Merriweather Post Pavillion
Columbia, Maryland
7|20|1990




ERASURE
Red Hot + Blue - Tribute To COLE PORTER
A Benefit For AIDS Research & Relief
Chrysalis
9|25|1990


ARTIST DESIGNED T-SHIRTS



VIDEO COMPILATION
(Originally released on VHS - re-issued on DVD)
1990 - 2006 



RECORD MIRROR MAGAZINE
10|20|1990




ERASURE & LENE LOVICH
Tame Yourself
R.N.A. (Rhino New Artists)
4|30|1991






TAME YOURSELF
Creem
6-7|1991



ERASURE & LENE LOVICH
Tame Yourself - Housebroken Dance Mixes [Limited Edition]
R.N.A. (Rhino New Artists)
1991




ERASURE
Chorus
Sire|Reprise
10|14|1991







PROMO US KROQ SESSIONS RADIO SPECIAL CASSETTE



(I have taken the liberty of burning the cassette onto a CD and making my own cover design)



PROMO UK CHORUS USERS MANUAL


PROMO UK FOLDER & PRESS RELEASE




PROMO US CHORUS KITE


AM I RIGHT? PROMO UK WINDOW CLING


PROMO CHORUS BILLBOARD AD


CHORUS
JAPANESE 3" CD RELEASE

ERASURE
LOVE TO HATE YOU
ALDB-140
Alfa Records
10|21|1991


VARIOUS MAGAZINE CLIPPINGS


ERASURE
Abba-esque
Mute|Elektra
6|30|1992










PROMO ABBA-ESQUE AD


ERASURE
ERASURE THE CONCERT - A PHANTASMAGORICAL ENTERTAINMENT
The Hammersmith Odeon
London, England
7|23|1992




SIGNED BY VINCE & ANDY


BINGO CARD



TOUR PIN


MERCHANDISE ORDER FORM



MEETING ANDY & VINCE BACKSTAGE
(THANK YOU CHRISTINE!!!)





The lovely people in the center are Andy's Aunt Christine & her daughter - they took me with them backstage in a truly unbelievable moment that I will cherish for the rest of my life!


PROMO PHOTO



VARIOUS MAGAZINE CLIPPINGS



ERASURE
ERASURE THE CONCERT - A PHANTASMAGORICAL ENTERTAINMENT
Center For The Arts | George Mason University
Fairfax, Virginia
12|11-12|1992



BINGO CARD



ERASURE
Erasure - The Tank The Swan And The Balloon Live!
(Erasure The Concert - A Phantasmagorical Entertainment)
1992

Renamed & Released On DVD In 2004


ERASURE
Pop! - The First 20 Hits
Sire|Reprise
11|24|1992




MELODY MAKER AD


ERASURE
I Say I Say I Say
Mute|Elektra
5|17|1994

















PROMO US RUN TO THE SUN GREETING CARD & CD




PROMO US BILLBOARD AD


I SAY I SAY I SAY
JAPANESE 3" CD RELEASES

ERASURE
RUN TO THE SUN
PCDY-00125
Mute Records Limited
7|21|1994


ERASURE
I LOVE SATURDAY
PCDY-00128
Mute Records Limited
11|18|1994


ERASURE
Wigstock (Soundtrack)
Sire
6|9|1995



ERASURE
Erasure
Mute|Elektra
10|24|1995












PROMO UK ERASURE WOODEN BOX SET
SIGNED BY ANDY & VINCE





PROMO UK STAY WITH ME BROCHURE





VARIOUS MAGAZINE CLIPPINGS


ERASURE
Modern Rock 1988 - Hang The DJ
Rhino
9|17|1996





ERASURE
[The Tiny Tour]
Special Guests: PEACH (Dubstar Cancelled)
Brixton Academy
London England
11|21|1996


TINY TOUR PIN


PHOTOS COURTESY OF MY CAMERA



THE TINY TOUR
Lucky Numbers Competition
(Prizw Draw Given Away @ Concerts)



ERASURE
Cowboy
Mute|Maverick
3|31|1997


PROMO US COWBOY CD








PROMO COWBOY UK COCKTAIL SHAKER


 PROMO COWBOY US COUNTER DISPLAY


EIS PHOTO


ERASURE
THE COWBOY TOUR
Bender Arena | American University
Washington DC
5|26|1997



ERASURE
Loveboat
Mute
10|23|2000




Artwork



Artwork



Artwork


Artwork

PROMO POSTCARD



ERASURE
Other People's Songs
Mute
1|28|2003
























PROMO OTHER PEOPLE'S SONGS US POSTER





ERASURE
Nightbird
Mute
1|25|2005


Vince Clarke's technical alchemy and Andy Bell's soulful, choirboy voice is Erasure. With their elegant dance pop mixed with flashy live show, Erasure's study in opposites has produced a luminescent collection of work that's charted dozens of hits and sold millions of records in North America, the UK and around the world for twenty years.

Uncompromising in their synth-based approach to music and production through the 80's, 90's and the present day, their influence has permanently penetrated the pop and dance landscape and has provided a blueprint for the thriving electronic indie underground from Brooklyn to Seattle. With their pop instincts and unparalleled showmanship once again on display with a new album and tour, Erasure are more relevant than ever as they return to the charts with their first studio album in seven years, Nightbird, and new single and video "Breathe."



At 44, Vince Clarke is undeniably one of the most influential figures in the short history of electronic music. Developing a reputation for hit songwriting first as one of the founding members of Depeche Mode in 1980 and then as one half of the legendary synth duo Yaz (Yazoo) in 1982 (formed with school friend Alison Moyet), Clarke is responsible for many of the definitive electro-pop classics of the era, including "Just Can't Get Enough," "Dreaming Of Me," "Situation," "Only You" and "Don't Go" - to name just a few.
Following the demise of Yaz and the short-lived Assembly (a one-off project with Feargal Sharkey), Vince found himself searching for a partner. Through an ad he placed in the UK music press, Clarke auditioned former professional meat mincer Andy Bell and settled on him as the new frontman for a new pop group -- Erasure. Twenty years later they are one of the most successful duos in the history of pop music.
Clarke and Bell's collaboration was wildly successful from the very first, when singles like "Who Needs Love Like That," "Heavenly Action" and the classic "Oh L'Amour" placed the pair in regular rotation on US dancefloors and alternative radio in early days of the format and paved the way for Erasure's 1986 debut, Wonderland. Defining an enchanted work of high drama dance pop, the disc - and Erasure's kaleidoscopic live show -- spawned the group's first major hit, "Sometimes," which reached #2 on the U.K. charts.



The Circus following in 1987, was propelled by an American tour with Duran Duran and instant dance classics like "It Doesn't Have To Be", "Victim Of Love" and the title track, which was subsequently re-released as the remix disc The Two Ring Circus, featuring six remixes and three re-recordings of the original LP.
In 1988, The Innocents, replete with some of Erasure's most assured and finely crafted work, went platinum in the States and sold over a million copies in Britain alone, launching the soulful, fervent hit, "Chains Of Love", the group's first American Top 40 hit. The band finished the year with their four track EP Crackers International.
Erasure's 1989 album, Wild, and its singles "Blue Savannah" and "Star", illustrated the growing strength and diversity of Andy and Vince's songwriting, pairing chilling ballads with Latin rhythms and bruised electro/psychodrama. Wild also marked the debut of a spectacular new stage show and a record-breaking tour that included the Far East, Japan, Australia, North and South America. 50,000 Argentineans gathered in a Buenos Aires park to watch a video of The Innocents; in New York, Erasure's Madison Square Garden show sold out in two hours flat.
Chorus, in 1990, opened still new sonic avenues for Erasure, with Andy's stratospheric vocal range playing counterpoint to Vince's deliberately synthetic, meticulously structured soundscapes. Abba-Esque, their playful paean to ABBA, was released in 1992 and yielded the hit, "Take A Chance On Me", which was a #1 U.K. single and, long before Mamma Mia, one of the first efforts to tap into the growing interest in the group and '70's nostalgia that was soon to overwhelm pop culture in the U.S.



Erasure's 1992 Phantasmagorical Entertainment tour kicked off with an unprecedented 15 nights at England's Manchester Apollo, and with another 15 at Hammersmith Odeon before launching a sold-out U.S. tour, including 13 sold-out shows at the Beacon Theater in New York City and 10 in Los Angeles. Their foray into theatrical extravaganza featured dancers, extra-musical activities such as bingo and ballooning, and a flurry of costume and scenery changes.
The combination of Clarke's near-robotic reserve and Bell's flamboyance on stage proved irresistible, wowing critics and fans alike. A new live performance DVD of that unforgettable tour, The Tank, The Swan and The Balloon has just been released.
Following the Phantasmagorical Entertainment shows, the band released Pop! The First 20 Hits and with their next studio effort I Say, I Say, I Say, Clarke and Bell began a new cycle of their stunning partnership, weaving a lavish sonic fantasy that couldn't have come from any other source. "Always", the first song released from I Say, I Say, I Say, became Erasure's most successful U.S. single to date and one of the biggest hits of 1994, according to Billboard's year-end chart.



For their ninth studio album, Erasure, released in 1995, Vince and Andy were in a more experimental mode, musically and vocally. Featuring guest performances by Diamanda Galas and the London Community Gospel Choir, Clarke and Bell surrounded such lovely ballads as "Stay with Me" with some of the lengthiest instrumental passages they've ever recorded, enlisting the expertise of producers Thomas Fehlmann (Orb) and Gareth Jones to realize their musical vision.
Despite its arrival at the very peak of the grunge movement in America, Erasure garnered some of the best reviews of the band's career. A first-ever acoustic performance at the opening of New York City's Spy Bar to celebrate the release of the disc was standing room only and proved what fans had known all along -- Erasure's success owed as much to their songs as their synths.



Signing to Maverick Records in spring of 1997, Clarke and Bell released a new single "In My Arms" and their eleventh studio album Cowboy. This album marked a return to the kind of up-tempo, three-minute dance-pop that earned Erasure legions of fans worldwide. The album was promoted with an all-request club tour and campy, Western-themed theater jaunt, which lived up to the group's well-earned reputation as first-class showman.
Following a quiet period for Erasure following The Cowboy tour, the turn-of-the-century was marked by a real rejuvenation for Clarke and Bell, including some lengthy atmospheric collaborations between Clarke and Human League/Heaven 17 founder Martin Ware. Clarke's prior work with Depeche Mode and Yaz has also been rediscovered by a whole new generation as the soundtracks to recent Gap ads, big budget car commercials and the placement of Yaz timeless hit "Only You" in The Office finale attest. This new attention to Erasure's musical legacy as well as the current '80s revival and the explosive growth of a new indie electronic scene, including such artists as Fisherspooner, The Postal Service, The Faint and many more, has vindicated Erasure's approach to music and production, proving that past is indeed prologue.
Clarke and Bell regrouped in 2003 to record and release Other People's Songs, a loving collection of covers of their favorite songs including a bubbly version of Peter Gabriel's "Solisbury Hill", which put them back in the Top 10 in the UK and generated a Top Of The Pops performance and sold out venues throughout the world. Hits! The Very Best of Erasure (Rhino) two-disk hits album followed, reminding us once again of the beloved and influential string of hits and pioneering remixes Erasure have amassed.



Following The Other Tour, Vince moved to the U.S. and continued writing and recording new songs for Erasure, as well as composing scores for short films and collaborating with Psychedelic Furs frontman Richard Butler on a bouncy piece of electro-pop for an episode of Johnny Bravo. Andy began work on a much-anticipated solo album that will likely be released following the Nightbird album and The Erasure Show tour is completed.
With the debut of Nightbird (Mute), a title referring to Bell's insomnia, Clarke and Bell have crafted a classic Erasure album which is sure to excite long-time fans and attract a whole new generation of listeners to their melodic and moving synth pop. It is the first original Erasure music released in the U.S. in nearly eight years. From the bittersweet and throbbing single "Breathe" to the atmospheric trip hop of "No Doubt" or retro-synth sounds of "Here I Got Impossible Again" and high energy dance groove of "All This Time Still Falling Out Of Love", Erasure's trademark sound -- Bell's angelic vocals buoyed by Clarke's effervescent synths -- is there in full force: fresher and more vibrant than ever.



"The last couple of albums were a bit moody and down," says Bell, as characteristically honest and direct as usual. "I'm so much happier with everything now, and so is Vince. You can hear it in the music. This is easily the best thing we've done for a long time."
"Andy is as excited about this record as he was when we first started releasing records," concurs Clarke. "He's like a little kid. And the record is more upbeat. We're both in a good spiritual place."
What better way, then, to launch another new phase of classic songwriting and innovative musicianship than with a record as uplifting, shiny and new as Nightbird?
Ordinarily, Andy Bell writes his lyrics in isolation, usually at home in North London. Indeed, he'd come up with some at the tail end of 2002, just as Erasure finished work on their last album, their covers collection Other People's Songs. But this time round, for the bulk of the words he flew to New York in early 2004, where Clarke has been living for the last couple of years. He put himself in his partner's environment, and merrily wrote away. No matter that it was February and nut-numbingly cold: flush with enthusiasm they rattled through six new songs.



For his part, Clarke had been busy exploring new working methods. Ever the technical innovator, he had crafted himself an artist's garret/studio based round a computer and two speakers in his apartment. He also found a decent, unshowy, hardworking little basement studio two blocks away in Brooklyn. Erasure had road-tested this new set-up in autumn 2003, recording a series of acoustic versions of highlights from their back catalogue.
"We just felt there were songs on our albums that had been missed as songs," says Clarke - understandable given that their canon tops 100 songs. "We found this cool guitarist [Steve Walsh] with a cool studio [Union Street] and decided to use both. He put the thing together. It was great going back through those songs, some of which I hadn't listened to properly since we made them - suddenly you heard some of the naivety that was in there in the first place."
The idea, says Bell, was "to show the songs in a different light, and show that they could work on whatever instrument, synthesizers or guitars. It makes such a different singing with acoustic instruments - there's more space, it seems. When you're using electronics they soak up part of the voice. Whereas [with] strings, the voice seems to vibrate off of them."



Emboldened by this New York recording experience - Erasure had had an abortive attempt at recording there once before, in Electric Lady Studios 15 years previously - and suitably emancipated from the pressures of deadlines or costs, Erasure worked at a feverish pace on Nightbird.
Ever the technical innovator, Clarke made good use of the internet. He'd email rough versions of songs to programmer Jon "JC" Collyer in London, and the two would then bat ideas back and forth. It was a speedy and liberating way to work.



"You can wake up in the morning and decide on what song you want to work on," notes Clarke, who had done a remix for Wit in precisely this manner. "And," adds this notably restless workaholic, "you don't have to wait for people to turn up."

PROMO NIGHTBIRD US  BADGES



ERASURE
Nightbird | In-store Appearance
Tower Records | Washington DC
6|7|2005


ERASURE
Union Street
Mute
4|3|2006


Erasure have always been full of surprises. In two decades of plugging in and wigging out, Vince Clarke and Andy Bell have sold millions of albums around the world, staged Broadway-style live spectaculars, and topped the charts with outlandish cover versions. The latest Book of British Hit Singles ranks the duo among the Top 100 Most Successful Acts of All Time and in 2005 The Times proclaimed them more important than Kraftwerk in the great history book of rock.



On their brand new album Union Street, Vince and Andy have delivered their biggest surprise yet. In a boldly experimental step for an electronic band, they have unplugged themselves, bringing new soulful new depths and acoustic textures of 11 songs spanning their entire career.
Union Street was recorded in the Brooklyn studio of the same name, which is owned by guitarist Steve Walsh, who previously played on Erasure's 2003 covers collection Other People's Songs and produced their 2005 album Nightbird. Walsh is currently assembling musicians for Erasure's first ever live-band tour. "We found this cool guitarist with a cool studio and decided to use both," says Vince.
The album is dominated by revamped album tracks and born-again B-sides that the band felt best suited an extreme makeover. All sound refreshingly different to their original blueprints. "It was great going back through those songs, some of which I hadn't listened to properly since we made them," Vince recalls. "Suddenly you heard some of the naivety that was in there in the first place."



The Erasure story began in 1985, when former Depeche Mode and Yazoo founder member Vince advertised to find a singer for his new project. Then just 21, ex-butcher Andy was the 41st candidate that Vince auditioned, but their creative chemistry clicked instantly. Before long the pair were scoring the first of five number one albums and started racking up an incredible 32 consecutive singles in the Top 40.



With more than 14 million albums sold so far, Erasure have always been proudly, defiantly, shamelessly pop - they even named their chart-topping greatest hits collection Pop! in 1992. But behind all those impressive sales figures and kitsch stage costumes, it has sometimes been overlooked just what consistently great songwriters Vince and Andy have been throughout their career.
Indeed, Andy insists one motivating factor behind Union Street was to "show the songs in a different light, and show that they could work on whatever instrument, synthesizers or guitars. Vince agrees: "We just felt there were songs on our albums that had been missed as songs."
And what fine songs they are. Originally recorded for the Cowboy album in 1997, Boy and Love Affair are both bittersweet farewells sung from the aftermath of ruined relationships. The former now packs an extra emotional punch from Andy's vaulting falsetto harmonies and generous dollops of Walsh's honeyed slide guitar, while the latter becomes a more graceful chamber music affair swept along by exquisite string arrangements.



Some tracks on Union Street have been completely transformed by their radical new arrangements. Spiralling, which started life on The Circus in 1987, is now a crisp marriage of finger-picking guitar and melancholy introspection. And Blues Away, taken from the 1994 album I Say, I Say I Say, is a rich, warm, sleep-eyed strum about yearning for that elusive perfect lover. "It's nearly bedtime, and I'm getting lonely..."
There is more heart-tugging slide guitar woven into Home, first heard in its electronic versions on the 1991 album Chorus, and Tenderest Moments, which featured on the b-side to Run To The Sun. This latter tune twinkles and shimmers like a desert sunset, overlaid with Andy's sublime harmonies as he follows the angels on a celestial mystery tour across the starry night sky.
The pared-down, organic textures of Union Street also create enough space for Andy to showcase the richer, more soulful depths of his vocal range. "It makes such a different singing with acoustic instruments, Andy says. "There's more space, it seems. When you're using electronics they soak up part of the voice. Whereas with strings, the voice seems to vibrate off of them."



Andy's mournful timbre on the languid, heartbroken Piano Song and the strikingly stark, regretful ballad How Many Times? are pure Nashville Noir. "We're going to be the first band ever to cross over from pop to country," Andy jokes. "We want to play the Grand Old Opry."
First heard on the 1995 album Erasure, Stay With Me is the former Top 20 hit once called "more beautiful than this world deserves" by The Guardian. Now it has been transformed into a sun-kissed serenade with a lively Spanish feel and a bubbling undertow of rapturous desire. Another former single from the same album, Rock Me Gently is reborn as the shiny celestial lullaby that closes Union Street. "There's more to life than thrills and spills and dollar bills", Andy swoons as a velvet chorus of gospel voices lulls him softly to sleep.
Union Street proves there has always been much more to Vince and Andy than shiny pop thrills. Unplugged, both musically and emotionally, they have never before sounded so graceful or so heartfelt. This is an album full of pleasant surprises. But coming from Erasure, that is no surprise at all.


ERASURE
Light At The End Of The World
Mute
5|22|2007


Leave it to Erasure to hole up in a cottage abutting the woods of Mid-Coast Maine, surrounded by ocean, forest and mountains to produce one of the most computer-based, modern albums of their career.


In a setting perhaps better suited to the creation of last year's critically-acclaimed acoustic Union Street project, Vince Clarke, Andy Bell and producer Gareth Jones (Depeche Mode, Wire, Clinic, Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds) spent six weeks last autumn recording the songs that comprise the new CD Light At The End Of The World. The most recent release in an incredibly fertile and prolific period, Light At the End Of World proves Erasure's creative vitality, musical influence and cultural relevance is just nearing its peak more than twenty years and twenty million albums into their historic collaboration.

Photo Credit: Steve Double

Heralded by the relentlessly up-tempo single 'I Could Fall In love With You', the song writing process for the ten-track Light At The End Of The World benefited from the organic surroundings in unexpected ways. Bell's lyrics are some of the most intensely personal of his career - true mediations on love, loss, regret, hope and starting over. Exciting and dramatic throughout, even in the quieter moments as on 'Darlene' and 'Glass Angel,' his voice soars on a bed of Clarke's pulsing and irresistibly melodic synths on virtually every verse and chorus, many of which are arranged quite traditionally despite the high-tech software employed to construct them.
The writing process for Light At The End Of The World was disciplined, beginning over the internet, with Clarke and Bell exchanging ideas via email, in two separate Maine song writing sessions last summer and ending with Bell writing and revising in the studio as the tracks were assembled daily by Clarke and Jones. Much had changed in their personal lives, Clarke was now married with an infant son and living in Maine while Bell had been navigating his way through the heart-wrenching break-up of a relationship of nearly two decades. Nevertheless, the song writing process that had brought them more than thirty Top 40 singles and eleven Top 20 albums, including five Number 1s, remained the same.





Vince explains it this way:
"Doing all our albums, me and Andy get together in a room with an analogue micro-cassette tape recorder," he says. "We have no melodic ideas, nothing, when we go in that room, which is the most amazing thing about it. I'll play guitar or piano - a selection of chords I think sound interesting. And Andy will sing a melody over the collection of chords. We'll do this for four chords, or eight bars. Then we'll have a melodic idea with a chord change, another short section, then the next collection of chords. There will be four or five parts like this that we record onto the tape recorder. Then we'll listen back and choose the bits we like for the chorus, say, and piece it together."
The process reveals itself immediately on the album opener 'Sunday Girl' where the simplicity of the lyrics and melody are merged to a swirl of electronics with stunning effect. Beginning with a processed, 'ghost-in-the-machine' vocal bit that literally revs the track, and the album, up into a full blown, other-worldly synth riff and hooky Brill Building-style chorus, the song twists and turns, dramatically underscoring the musical and emotional journey that is about to unfold. Likewise 'Sucker For Love'.



Says Andy, "...quite a few of the songs start off in a lower key than when they're finished and 'Sucker for Love' was one of those. It was quite low and quite Gospel-y, but as we're working on a song, we change the keys, change the tempos, just to make it as exciting as possible. I think that's kind of in the same vein as 'Sunday Girl', really. It's like a really up-tempo dance song, which you're not quite sure where it fits in, but I think it's one of the strongest songs."
Track after track, from the hopeful 'Golden Heart' to the regretful 'Fly Away', the songs are matched beautifully to the emotional sonic backdrops that rise and fall on Bell's breathy and assured vocals. 'When A Lover Leaves You', the penultimate track, perhaps best sums up spirit of the entire album. With Bell torn between two lovers, yearning for the one, and worried for the other, Clarke devises a gorgeous synth-pop samba to ease the pain. 'Dance away the heartache,' to coin a phrase, indeed. Classic Erasure.
Unfazed by their iconic reputation among such chart-topping devotees as The Killers, Franz Ferdinand and Madonna and having eclipsed, according to The Times, no less than Kraftwerk in influence among today's hit makers, Erasure left their reputation as one of the Top 100 Most Successful Acts Of All Time at the studio door and proceeded to make one of their most heartfelt and mature albums ever. And as ever, have turned out a collection that is one of the few places where punk, electronica and disco can still co-exist naturally.



Owing a tip of the hat as much to Simon & Garfunkel as their electronic forebears, Light At The End of World is as magical and spiritual as its title suggests. A snapshot, both musically and lyrically, of Clarke and Bell at this moment, proud of their legacy but unafraid to take chances, still growing as artists but true to their electronic roots, and still greeting the ups and downs of life with a song.



"This album is to show people that our pop isn't finished," Andy declares. "It's saying we can still do it, we can still write great songs," he adds, trying to pinpoint Erasure's appeal. "We're a bizarre mixture - people don't get it a lot of the time. We're quite British and working class - working people love a good tune in a pub - but we're also quite eccentric. We're the UK version of Sparks: the Gilbert & George of electronic pop. And we don't play the game."


ERASURE
BILLBOARD
Special Feature
6|23|2007





VARIOUS MAGAZINE CLIPPINGS



ERASURE
LIGHT AT THE END OF THE WORLD TOUR
House Of Blues
Cleveland, Ohio
8|1|2007


ERASURE
Tomorrow's World
Mute
10|3|2011




For all the heartbreak and uncertainty on Tomorrow's World, sunny euphoria and romantic optimism are still the brightest colours in Erasure's musical rainbow.
One of the most successful and globally adored partnerships in pop, Erasure celebrate 25 years together with a fabulous new album, Tomorrow's World. After selling 25 million albums and scoring more than 40 hit singles, Vince Clarke and Andy Bell are back on peak form with their 14th studio album, a masterpiece of warm-blooded electro-pop and emotionally charged electro-soul that sounds as glossy, contemporary and exciting as any of their younger chart acolytes. With synthetic melodies and electronic beats as dominant as ever, Erasure's timeless anthems of hedonism and heartache are set to strike a universal chord once more.
Returning from a four-year sabbatical, Andy and Vince sound refreshed, revitalised and rebooted on Tomorrow's World. To produce the album, they enlisted the services of rising British electro-pop star Vincent "Frankmusik" Frank, the one-man-band whose glittering portfolio of remixes and collaborations includes Lady Gaga, Pet Shop Boys and Ellie Goulding. Currently based in LA, where he has his own studio, Frank was born in 1985 Ð the year that Erasure formed.
Vince explains, "We chose Frank because he is someone who has a different approach to the music, who is sympathetic to synthesizers, and incredibly keen. He told me the music scene in London was just too small for him, so he made a conscious decision and moved to LA, with nothing! He just really likes that American pop thing Ð that whole Lady Gaga, full-on wall of sound."
The combination of Erasure's timeless songwriting and Frank's lush, heavily processed studio sound makes for a gloriously fertile musical mix. Andy and Vince explode with energy on disco-friendly love missiles like Be With You and Fill Us With Fire, euphoric declarations of love wrapped in liquid shimmers of state-of-the-art electro-pop. Andy cites Kylie, A-Ha, Robyn and The Killers as influences on these tunes but they could equally stand alongside the most forward-thinking dance-pop artists of today, from Katy B to Lady Gaga to David Guetta. This is 21st century party music made with wit, wisdom and warmth.
As with all Erasure albums, Tomorrow's World contains bittersweet introspection and sophisticated melancholy too. The gorgeous break-up anthem What Will I Say When You're Gone? borrows from contemporary post-dubstep sonics in its staccato musical framework, while the sumptuous relationship post-mortem When I Start To (Break It All Down) already sounds like a future stadium-filling classic in the making. Andy reveals his brooding crooner side on Just When I Thought It Was Ending, but also unleashes the full blast of his gospel-diva talents on You've Got To Save Me Right Now, a mighty electro-gospel hymn built around a whirling waltz-time rhythm.
But for all the heartbreak and uncertainty on Tomorrow's World, sunny euphoria and romantic optimism are still the brightest colours in Erasure's musical rainbow. Even when the hedonistic rush is tinged with desperation, as in the doomed-diva chronicle A Whole Lotta Love Run Riot or the late-night confessional Then I Go Twisting, operatic vocals and soaring melodies are still shooting for the stars above. Blasted skywards by Frank's shiny, supercharged, ultra-glossy production, both tracks sound like massive Ibiza trance-pop anthems for the long hot summer of 2012.
In the four years since their last studio album The Light At The End of the World, Erasure have been busy with multiple outside projects. Vince reunited with Alison Moyet to reactivate their legendary synth-soul duo Yazoo, rebuilt his studio at his house in Maine, and picked up an Outstanding Song Collection prize at the Ivor Novello awards in recognition of his 30 years as a songwriter. Meanwhile, Andy released his acclaimed solo album Non-Stop and lent his powerhouse voice to the TV reality show Pop Star To Opera Star. But even in their extended gap year, Erasure were never far from the charts, releasing their double retrospective Total Pop! Ð The First 40 Hits in 2009.
This solid-gold songwriting chemistry is key to why Erasure have survived and thrived for over 25 years. Andy and Vince still write the same way they always have - together in the same room, face to face, waiting for inspiration to strike. Fortunately, it always does.
"It is just spur of the moment, we can't write separately" Vince explains. "We are always in a studio with guitar and piano", adds Andy. "It has got be the actual physical thing of us being there and doing it. But the songwriting is always in flux. Sometimes it's easy, sometimes it's hard."
"I think it's getting harder", says Vince, "but that's probably because we're a bit more picky. We tend to write more ideas than songs now. The way we used to work, we'd have one or two or three ideas, then piece them together into a song. Now we have five or six or seven ideas, so it gets more confusing. But there is still an incredible amount of satisfaction once you've finished a song."
Behind this musical partnership, of course, lies one of the most enduring friendships in pop. In more than 25 years together, Vince insists he and Andy have never had a single serious argument, and always respected each other's creative input into Erasure.
"When we're together we are really together, but when were apart we don't talk to each other," Vince explains. "I think that's part of it. And also we are both pretty low key, neither of us gets particularly precious about ideas. We don't argue about album titles or anything."
"I just don't see why there is any need for drama," says Andy, ironically one of the most flamboyantly dramatic frontman in pop. "Vince and I are very similar people really. We are quite monkish, quite Zen about what we do. We definitely share sense of humour, but I also think politics is important. We don't talk about it that often, but we both know what's fair and not fair, who's a devil and who isn't."
Erasure may have been synth-pop pioneers in the 1980s and 1990s, but they never rest on their laurels. Unlike many of their former chart peers, Andy and Vince have consistently avoided the creative death knell of nostalgia tours. Both are huge fans of contemporary electronic music and club sounds. They remain a vital, forward-thinking force in 21st century pop.
"In the 1980's and early 1990's, if you counted the number of purely electronic bands in the charts, there wasnÕt that much really," Vince says with a smile. "Now it's like 90 per cent! Who would have thought that? This whole new electronic scene is really exciting, and I don't think anybody sounds like the music from back then, just because they are using synthesizers. Erasure have never been about nostalgia. We are not thinking about records we made in the 1980's, even if other people are. We are thinking about the next record - and future records."
After more than 25 years together, Tomorrow's World is the sound of Erasure rebooted, rejuvenated and fully recharged. Timeless and universal, they never look back. Such is the essence of great pop: a glorious celebration of right here, right now. Come and join the party.


ERASURE
TOMORROW'S WORLD TOUR
9:30 Club
Washington DC
9|6|2011




Live Photos Taken By My Friend: JOHN KRETCHMAN










PAUL HICKEY
Sometimes - A Life Of Love, Loss And Erasure
6|22|2011


R.I.P.
PAUL HICKEY
4|11|2012

Love & Respect.


ERASURE
Gaudete
Mute
10|28|2013


ERASURE
Snow Globe [Deluxe Edition Boxset]
Mute
11|11|2013



SIGNED GREETING CARD



POSTCARDS






COCKTAIL BOOK


CANDY



PROMOTION


video


ERASURE
Gaudete [Limited Edition Seasonal Card With CD]
Mute
12|8|2013





ERASURE
Make It Wonderful
Mute
2|24|2014



DAVE AUDÉ & ANDY BELL
Aftermath [Here We Go]
Audacious Records
4|1|2014



For all the latest news and up to the minute information on ERASURE, please visit their official website:

http://www.erasureinfo.com/



3 comments:

  1. Thank you, I certainly am thrilled with it! If only I could find the few I'm missing!

    ReplyDelete
  2. Hi Lansure,

    You have some great Erasure stuff there. I used to have the early EIS newsletters and photos but I'm not sure where they have gone. I had forgotton about the EIS membership badge.

    One item I made sure I did look after was a gold disc interview with Andy and Vince. It had the counter culture logo on it. I've uploaded it to my website if you wanted to include it on here, although I guess you actually have most of this stuff. Here's the linkif you want to see it:
    http://www.pixelfire.com.au/images/erasure-gold-disc.jpg

    Not sure how to get the recording from vinyl to didgital audio.

    Cheers,
    Neil.



    ReplyDelete